Brit living in Belgium and earning an income from building interfaces. Interestes include science, science fiction, technology, and European news and politics
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Hero Patterns – A collection of SVG background patterns for your web projects

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superiphi
14 hours ago
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Ha, some things on the internet never change...
Idle, Bradford, United Kingdom
expatpaul
14 hours ago
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Belgium
StunGod
17 hours ago
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Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
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skittone
5 hours ago
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They don't look bad. What's the problem with svg backgrounds?

Tony Blair is right about Brexit

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I don’t know about you but if I were to make a speech arguing that democracy should be abandoned, I…

See the full story of Tony Blair is right about Brexit on Coffee House.

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expatpaul
23 hours ago
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Belgium
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Anti-Theodicy

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
I think you could do an entirely novel exegesis of the Old Testament based around this premise.

New comic!
Today's News:

Hey! Geeks of London! Come see me, March 25th, at Imperial.

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popular
5 hours ago
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expatpaul
1 day ago
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Belgium
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dmierkin
2 hours ago
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:-)

Neil Gaiman announces Neverwhere sequel, The Seven Sisters

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Author says the new fantasy novel has been inspired by his work with UN refugee agency and ‘the shape London is in now’

Neil Gaiman, whose latest book Norse Mythology is set to top the bestseller lists this weekend, has announced his next project: the sequel to another hit, Neverwhere, more than 20 years after it was first published.

Neverwhere tells the story of Richard Mayhew, an ordinary young man drawn into the fantastical landscape of London Below, an otherworldly city populated by real landmarks and legends personified, including the Old Bailey, the Black Friars and the Angel, Islington – among which the lost, homeless and dispossessed of London move. The idea came from a chat with Gaiman’s friend, the comedian and actor Lenny Henry, who suggested the concept of tribes of homeless people living beyond the notice of “ordinary” people in London.

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expatpaul
1 day ago
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I really enjoyed Neverwhere - both the TV series and the novel - back in the day. So I'll be keen to see how The Seven Sisters turns out.
Belgium
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'Guardians Vol. 2' Test Screening Rates It Marvel's Best Ever

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The Marvel Cinematic Universe may have finally, truly peaked as Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 tested a perfect 100 during an early screening, the absolute highest of any film in the MCU thus far. Almost every film in the industry gets screened by test audiences, mostly randos who then rate the film between 1 and 100, and the studio might make edits based on that feedback. Marvel — which values secrecy above all else — tests from a comparatively narrow collection of friends and family members, but these results are still telling: 100% of the people who’ve seen the film have rated it a 100.

Read More... 'Guardians Vol. 2' Test Screening Rates It Marvel's Best Ever
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expatpaul
4 days ago
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I am really looking forward to this film.
Belgium
miohtama
9 days ago
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Helsinki, Finland
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Twenty years of Brass Eye

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This article appears in the Witness section of the Spring 2017 issue of the New Humanist. Subscribe today.

In 1997 Conservative MP David Amess appeared on a Channel 4 programme earnestly condemning a new drug called “Cake”. “A big yellow death bullet in the head of some poor user – or custard gannet as the dealers call them,” he said. The only problem was, Cake didn’t exist and the programme he appeared on was Brass Eye, a taboo-breaking satirical show that eviscerated Britain’s media culture.

The show was the creation of Chris Morris, already well known for the spoof news programme The Day Today, which he co-created with Armando Iannucci. When Brass Eye first aired 20 years ago, the broadcasting code forbade programme makers from misleading interviewees for the purpose of entertainment. Brass Eye gleefully ignored this restriction, luring politicians and minor celebrities into making all manner of absurd statements. After it was aired, Channel 4 defended the show and an amendment – often referred to as “the Brass Eye clause” – was added to the code.

Amess, who also raised the topic of Cake in the House of Commons, wasn’t the only public figure to fall prey. Among others, the show featured comedian Bernard Manning describing a girl throwing up her own pelvis after eating Cake and radio DJ Dr Fox saying that it was “scientific fact” that paedophiles shared more genes with crabs than humans.

In 2001 Brass Eye returned with a one-off episode, the now notorious Paedogeddon, which took aim at media hysteria over child abuse. It was insensitive, brash and very funny. At the time, the tabloids condemned it as “unspeakably sick”, while the Guardian quoted Morris telling a colleague: “If I was happy at the result I’d need to have had my brains sucked out through a straw. Because the only conclusion is such a depressing one – that the standard of public debate is so lamentably low; what’s good or satisfying about that?”

Brass Eye was far more than a satire of news coverage. It took aim at ignorance and hypocrisy, highlighting the stupidity of celebrities and politicians who will parrot clearly ludicrous lines without taking a few minutes to fact-check, but also the frequently inconsistent responses of the public. Twenty years on, its taboo-busting comedy remains as shocking and prescient as ever, illustrating the absurdity that follows when facts cease to matter. The Paedogeddon episode ends with a mob of people setting fire to a street: we wouldn’t dare suggest that as an apt metaphor for today’s political and media discourse.

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expatpaul
4 days ago
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I should dig out my Brass Eye DVD and watch it again. I suspect the series has held up depressingly well.
Belgium
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