Brit living in Belgium and earning an income from building interfaces. Interestes include science, science fiction, technology, and European news and politics
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Gwyneth Paltrow didn't want Condé Nast to fact-check Goop articles

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Partnership between publisher and lifestyle site to produce a magazine fell apart due to ‘old-school’ rules, actor says

Gwyneth Paltrow’s partnership with Condé Nast was touted by the publisher’s artistic director Anna Wintour as a “something remarkable, a thoroughly modern take on how we live today”. The plan was for the publisher to make a regular Goop magazine, but it all fell apart when Condé Nast wanted to fact-check Goop articles, according to an interview with Paltrow in the New York Times Magazine.

Paltrow wanted to publish interviews with non-traditional healers and practitioners, as they do on the Goop website. She wasn’t especially concerned about checking whether what they said in their answers was medically correct or even scientifically possible. But Condé Nast insisted on claims being verified – when that became impossible, some health interviews were replaced with quickly pulled together travel pieces. The magazine closed after two issues and the partnership ended.

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MotherHydra
24 days ago
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Gwyneth Paltrow, modern day snake oils peddler.
Space City, USA
expatpaul
24 days ago
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So Gwyneth Paltrow thinks that checking your facts is to “do things in a very old-school way”. Because things like honesty and integrity are sooo last century.
Belgium
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Literary Analysis

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Hey, it's that captain whose leg got stuck in my teeth!


Today's News:
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satadru
20 days ago
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New York, NY
expatpaul
24 days ago
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Belgium
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1 public comment
jlvanderzwan
24 days ago
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Quick, someone take a Moby Dick audiobook and give it the hamster voice treatment.

Lunar eclipse on 27 July will be visible in Belgium

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Lunar eclipse on 27 July will be visible in Belgium
A lunar eclipse due to take place on 27 July will be visible from Belgium, the Mira Observatory in Grimbergen has said.
A lunar eclipse takes place when the moon passes directly behind the earth, which then casts a shadow on its satellite, which normally reflects the light of the sun back to earth (the moon produces no light of its own).

The effect will be visible just after the moon arises at around 21.25 on Friday, and will last until around 01.00 on Saturday morning. The moon will still be visible in shadow, taking on a red-brown hue (see photo) until around 23.15, when it will start to move gradually out of the shadows.

The observatory, which will be specially open from 22.00 to 01.00 on the night, said the last occasion for viewing such a total eclipse was three years ago. All celestial bodies – sun, moon and earth – have to be in perfect alignment for the phenomenon to occur.

Visitors to the observatory will not only be able to view the eclipse in the best available circumstances, but will also be able to see other objects in the night sky using the telescopes and powerful binoculars available. They will also be able to view the passage of the International Space Station.

The phenomenon can also be followed on the YouTube channel of Mira.

Alan Hope
The Brussels Times
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expatpaul
26 days ago
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I'm sharing this so I don't forget about it
Belgium
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Now That’s What I Call Music 100 a terrifying reminder of your own fragile mortality

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The release of Now 100 has today brought home to people who grew up in the 80s and 90s  the terrifying way time and life is slipping them by.
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expatpaul
30 days ago
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Of course, I had to go and check whether Now 100 really is a thing. It is, and I feel old now.

I also noticed that Disk 1 is the kids disk and Disk 2 is the Dads disk.
Belgium
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EU imposes record 4.34 billion euros fine on Google

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EU imposes record 4.34 billion euros fine on Google
Wednesday, the EU imposed a record 4.34 billion euros fine on Google, this time in connection with the Android antitrust file, a decision that risks damaging its relations with the US even more.
This financial sanction, aiming at punishing the American company for having misused the dominant position of its smartphone exploitation system, Android, in order to consolidate its online research service supremacy, smashes the previous record, already detained by Google. “Google used illicit practices to cement its dominant position in online research,’’ accused the EU Competition Commissioner, Margrethe Vestager, during a Brussels press conference.

“Google’s research engine is its flagship product. Each year, Google generates more than 95 billion dollars revenue through advertisements shown and clicked on by Google Search users, and a large part of its income is due to the increasing power of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets,’’ added the Danish Commissioner.

The company had already been condemned, on 27 June 2017, by the European Commission, to pay a record 2.42 billion euro fine for having misused its dominant position in online research by favoring its price comparator “Google Shopping,” to the detriment of competing services.

The amount of the fine is decided at the last minute and can theoretically reach up to 10% of the company’s overall worldwide sales, which according to Google’s parent company, Alphabet, was as high as 110.9 billion dollars in 2017 (94.7 billion euros).

The European Commission also requested the American company “to put an end to its illicit practices within 90 days, failing which, penalty payments would be imposed, rising up to 5% of Alphabet’s average daily sale revenue worldwide.’’ “Google will appeal against this European administration’s decision,’’ announced immediately Google’s spokesperson, Al Verney, in a press communication.

This new sanction against the American giant comes within a particularly tense context between the EU and the US, in which sensitive topics are numerous, such as NATO and trade. Next Wednesday, the EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker goes to Washington in order to attempt to defuse the trade conflict that divides the EU and the American President Donald Trump, who is prepared to tax European car imports into his country.

The Android antitrust file — the exploitation system used by 80% of the devices in Europe and worldwide, which is the equivalent of the iOS for Apple’s iPhones — has been on the EU Commission’s radar for several years. In its communication, the EU Commission described its complaints against Google in detail.

Firstly, the Californian group required manufacturers to preinstall the Google Search application and its navigator (Chrome) as a condition for them to be granted the license for its online applications store (Play Store).

Secondly, it paid a number of great manufacturers and big mobile network operators so that they would preinstall Google applications only on their devices.

And thirdly, it prevented the manufacturers who wished to preinstall the Google applications to sell even one smart mobile device that runs on other Android versions unapproved by Google.

In the Shopping antitrust case, Google had submitted solutions in September, that are still under investigation by the European Commission. The Californian group had also deposed before the EU Court of Justice (CJEU), in September 2017, an appeal against the Brussels fine, which it will certainly do again in the Android case.

Considering the complexity of the affairs, approximately two years should be necessary before a court ruling.

Besides Shopping and Android, the European Commission has a third iron in the fire against Google’s advertisement practices.

It criticizes the group since 14 July 2016 for having misused its dominant position with AdSense, its advertising society (80% of the market in Europe), by artificially limiting the possibility of third web sites to advertise contextual ads coming from competitors. There too, a fine could be in view.

The first Silicon Valley company to have been imposed a gigantic fine from the European Commission in an antitrust case is Microsoft. In 2004, the American IT group was the object of a financial sanction of 497 million euros for having refused to provide complete technical documentation to its competitors, so that they might create software that is fully compatible with the Windows exploitation system.

Oscar Schneider
The Brussels Times
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expatpaul
30 days ago
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"[Google's] smartphone exploitation system, Android"

This is probably a translation issue, but it is also an eerily accurate description of Google's approach.
Belgium
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Oldest swinger in town, Slackware, notches up a quarter of a century

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Venerable Linux distro still keeping it clean, after all these years

Slackware, the oldest Linux distribution still being maintained, has turned 25 this week, making many an enthusiast wonder where all those years went.…

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expatpaul
31 days ago
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I tried to install Slackware about ten years ago when I was still very new to all this Linux stuff -- and failed miserably.

I really ought to give it another try one of these days.
Belgium
superiphi
22 days ago
It's still my default distro when I go Linux. Because the unsexy simplicity of structure means you can recover from every problem or mistake. Contrast with mint where removing the stupid moo quotes breaks the OS, because of how it's packaged
expatpaul
20 days ago
I know what you mean. I find that Arch based distros give me a sufficient level of control of my environment -- and I've become a bit too spoiled by the rolling release model.
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